Using Your Keywords In Page Titles

It is strongly recommended that you make use of keywords in the page titles themselves. This title tag can be different from a Meta tag, but it is truly worth considering in relation to them. Whatever text one chooses to place in the title tag (between the and portions) will appear in the title bar of browsers when they decide to view the web page. Some browsers can also append whatever you put in the title tag by adding their own name, as for example Microsoft’s Internet Explorer or OPERA.

The actual text that you use in the title tag is one of the most important factors in how a search engine might decide to rank your web page. Additionally, all major web crawlers will use the text of your title tag as the text they use for the title of your page in your listings.

If you have designed your website as a series of websites or linked pages and not just as a single Home Page, you must always bear in mind that each page of your website must be well optimized for the search engines. The title of each page i.e. the keywords that you use on that page and the phrases that you use in the content will consequently draw traffic to your site.

The unique combination of these words and phrases and content will hopefully draw customers using different search engine terms and techniques, so always make sure that you capture all the keywords and phrases that you need for each product, service or information page.

One of the most common mistakes made by small business owners when they first design their website is to place their business name or firm name in every title of every page. Actually most of your prospective customers do not bother to know the name of your firm until after they have looked at your site and decided it is worth book marking.

So, whilst you want your business name in the title of the home page, it will probably be a waste of valuable keywords and space to put it in the title line of every page on your site. So why not consider putting keywords in the title so that your page will display even closer to the top of the search engine listing.

Dedicating the first three positions for keywords in the title whilst avoiding the stop words like ‘and’, ‘at’ and the like is most crucial in search engine optimization.


Michael Beattie is contributing editor at WebDesignArticles.net. This article may be reproduced provided that its complete content, links and author byline are kept intact and unchanged. No additional links permitted. Hyperlinks and/or URLs must remain both human clickable and search engine spiderable.

Improving Website Usability

No matter how good your website design might be, if it is hard for you to reach your site’s content then your site will be really quite useless. Below are a few tips that will help you to improve on your website’s usability in order to ensure that it serves its functions in an optimal manner.

The first method is to make sure that your site’s content has a suitable topography. If you have large blocks of text, try to make sure to use CSS in order to space out the lines accordingly. The longer a single line of text might be, the greater you should make the line-height of each line. Further, try to make sure that the font size of your text is big enough to be read with ease. Some sites contain a 10-pixel-tall text in Verdana font; although that might look neat and tidy, you will have to really focus your eyes to read the actual text properly.

Try to make it easy for visitors to find the content they need on your site. If you have thousands of articles on your site and a certain visitor wants to find one single article in the pile, you will have to provide a practicable means that will make it possible for visitors to do that without any trouble. Whether it is an SQL-driven database search engine or just a glossary or index of articles that you have, providing such a feature will ensure your visitors can use your site more easily.

If you don’t want to lose visitors, try to make sure that your site loads faster. Most internet users will click away from a website if it doesn’t load completely within 15 seconds, so make sure that only the best of your website is delivered to the visitors and as soon as possible, in order to retain their attention.

Lastly, try to test each and every link on your site before it goes online. There is nothing worse and unprofessional than a site with broken links, so make sure you bear it well in mind.


Norman Mather is contributing editor at WebDesignArticles.net. This article may be reproduced provided that its complete content, links and author byline are kept intact and unchanged. No additional links permitted. Hyperlinks and/or URLs must remain both human clickable and search engine spiderable.