Using Your Keywords In Page Titles

It is strongly recommended that you make use of keywords in the page titles themselves. This title tag can be different from a Meta tag, but it is truly worth considering in relation to them. Whatever text one chooses to place in the title tag (between the and portions) will appear in the title bar of browsers when they decide to view the web page. Some browsers can also append whatever you put in the title tag by adding their own name, as for example Microsoft’s Internet Explorer or OPERA.

The actual text that you use in the title tag is one of the most important factors in how a search engine might decide to rank your web page. Additionally, all major web crawlers will use the text of your title tag as the text they use for the title of your page in your listings.

If you have designed your website as a series of websites or linked pages and not just as a single Home Page, you must always bear in mind that each page of your website must be well optimized for the search engines. The title of each page i.e. the keywords that you use on that page and the phrases that you use in the content will consequently draw traffic to your site.

The unique combination of these words and phrases and content will hopefully draw customers using different search engine terms and techniques, so always make sure that you capture all the keywords and phrases that you need for each product, service or information page.

One of the most common mistakes made by small business owners when they first design their website is to place their business name or firm name in every title of every page. Actually most of your prospective customers do not bother to know the name of your firm until after they have looked at your site and decided it is worth book marking.

So, whilst you want your business name in the title of the home page, it will probably be a waste of valuable keywords and space to put it in the title line of every page on your site. So why not consider putting keywords in the title so that your page will display even closer to the top of the search engine listing.

Dedicating the first three positions for keywords in the title whilst avoiding the stop words like ‘and’, ‘at’ and the like is most crucial in search engine optimization.


Michael Beattie is contributing editor at WebDesignArticles.net. This article may be reproduced provided that its complete content, links and author byline are kept intact and unchanged. No additional links permitted. Hyperlinks and/or URLs must remain both human clickable and search engine spiderable.

How To Redirect Your URLs By Using META Tags

There are many occasions when you might wish to display your URL in the form yourdomain/display.html but would like, instead, to direct visitors to another URL, say some-other-domain/best-mouse-trap.html.

For example, you could be promoting an affiliate program with URL your-merchant-URL/sales-page/your-affiliate-code, and you think that the URL is too long, or you want to hide the fact that it is an affiliate link, or you might want to prevent people from stealing your affiliate commission, you could use this technique. You could even check how many people have clicked on your affiliate link, through checking the number of clicks of the displayed URL before it is redirected, from your Web site log.

Here is another example. If you are using a tracking software, or a tracking company, to track your advertisement, usually, the tracking URL will be in the form of your-tracking-URL/…/tracking-?blah-blah or tracking-company-URL/…/tracking-?blah-blah. You want to use your own domain name or you don’t want others know that you are tracking the ad. You can use the URL your-URL/your-sales-description which redirects visitors to the tracking URL.

Knowledge of technique of redirecting URLs will give you a lot of, amongst other benefits, flexibility. Here is how to do it with META tags…

Create the page, “display.html,” with the following META tag in between the HEAD and /HEAD tags in the HTML codes…

META http-equiv = “refresh” content = “0; URL = some-other-URL/best-mouse-trap.html” without any other content (if you wish, you could include the title “World’s Best Mouse Trap” in between the TITLE and /TITLE tags, to show that this page is about mouse traps).

Upload the page “display.html” to the root directory of your Web site. With that, when visitors click on the link of your-URL/display.html, they will be redirected to some-other-URL/best-mouse-trap.html.

Please note that for the URL some-other-URL/best-mouse-trap.html in the above META tag, and other URLs through out the rest of the article, you should include the “http” protocol which has been omitted.

The following variation of the above method can give you a neater way of displaying your URL, namely, without using the “.html” extension in your displayed URL…

First create a sub-directory, say “best-mouse-trap” in the root directory at your Web site. Instead of naming the Web page created above as display.html, name it as index.html.
Upload this “index.html” file into the sub-directory “best-mouse-trap”. And then, when your visitors click on the URL your-URL/best-mouse-trap they will be redirected to some-other-URL/best-mouse-trap.html.


Michael Beattie is contributing editor at WebDesignArticles.net. This article may be reproduced provided that its complete content, links and author byline are kept intact and unchanged. No additional links permitted. Hyperlinks and/or URLs must remain both human clickable and search engine spiderable.